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Brachial plexus injuries

Brachial plexus injuries

The brachial plexus is a network of intertwined nerves that control movement and sensation in the arm and hand. A traumatic brachial plexus injury involves sudden damage to these nerves, and may cause weakness, loss of feeling, or loss of movement in the shoulder, arm, or hand. The brachial plexus is formed from five nerves that originate in the spinal cord at the neck. The plexus connects these five nerves with the nerves that provide sensation to the skin and permit movement in the muscles of the arm and hand. There is a brachial plexus on each side of the body. Each of the five nerves in the brachial plexus has a specific function, such as powering muscles or carrying sensory information from the hand to the brain. Because each nerve has a function, the location of the nerve injury within the plexus is important for predicting outcomes and for planning treatment.

When nerves arising from the cervical cord (neck region) are divided or avulsed, an affected person doesn't have movement at his shoulder, elbow, and hand. Depending on the severity of injury patient may lose movements at one or all levels (joints) described above. Brachial plexus injuries( BPI) is manageable surgically at Bisoniya hospital.

Brachial Plexus Injuries
Bisoniya Hospital